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Maine Bans Offshore Wind Turbines Afraid They Will Hurt Lobster Industry

Maine governor Janet Mills (D-ME) supports offshore wind, but those working in the lobster industry are worried that offshore wind turbines will threaten their livelihood. So the Maine legislature has unanimously approved a compromise, which Mills is expected to sign because she introduced the proposal.

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Maine governor Janet Mills (D-ME) supports offshore wind, but those working in the lobster industry are worried that offshore wind turbines will threaten their livelihood. So the Maine legislature has unanimously approved a compromise, which Mills is expected to sign, because she introduced the proposal.

Basically, state waters will be used for fishing and recreation, and offshore wind energy will be prioritized in federal waters farther from the Maine coast.

There will be a moratorium, which will last until March 1, 2031, on projects close to the coast, and the state is working with New England Aqua Ventus on a floating offshore wind technology demonstration project, the first in the US, in federal waters.

Further, there will also be a group created called the Offshore Wind Research Consortium that will include members of fishing groups. 

At the end of April, Mills said:

We will focus these efforts in federal waters farther off our coast, as we responsibly pursue a small research array that can help us establish the best way for Maine to embrace the vast economic and environmental benefits of offshore wind.

Fundamentally, I do not believe offshore wind and Maine’s fishing industry are mutually exclusive. I believe they not only can coexist, but, together, can help us build a stronger economy with more good-paying jobs and a brighter, more sustainable future for Maine people.

Read more: Maine becomes the first US state to divest from fossil fuels

Basically, state waters will be used for fishing and recreation, and offshore wind energy will be prioritized in federal waters farther from the Maine coast.

There will be a moratorium, which will last until March 1, 2031, on projects close to the coast, and the state is working with New England Aqua Ventus on a floating offshore wind technology demonstration project, the first in the US, in federal waters.

Further, there will also be a group created called the Offshore Wind Research Consortium that will include members of fishing groups. 

At the end of April, Mills said:

We will focus these efforts in federal waters farther off our coast, as we responsibly pursue a small research array that can help us establish the best way for Maine to embrace the vast economic and environmental benefits of offshore wind.

Fundamentally, I do not believe offshore wind and Maine’s fishing industry are mutually exclusive. I believe they not only can coexist, but, together, can help us build a stronger economy with more good-paying jobs and a brighter, more sustainable future for Maine people.

Read more: Maine becomes the first US state to divest from fossil fuels

 

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