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Mental Health Services for Camden County Residents

 

(Camden, NJ) – The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to dramatically alter our day-to-day activities. From small adjustments like mandatory mask wearing, to life-changing events like lost loved ones or prolonged unemployment, the pandemic can be a serious strain on mental health. For some, managing comes easy, but for those struggling to cope, support is available. Screen Shot 2020-12-24 at 22.10.05

“From the beginning of this pandemic, we have been fighting a war on multiple fronts. While much of our collective attention has been paid to protecting physical health, we need everyone to make sure they are closely monitoring their mental health as well,” said Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. “Fortunately, as the pandemic has continued, assistance and resources to cope with its effects have become more robust. If you are facing fear, anxiety, or depression because of COVID-19, do not ignore it, seek assistance and take care of yourself.”

In New Jersey, residents who are having difficulty coping with the COVID-19 crisis can call the Mental Health Association in New Jersey, Inc. at (877) 294- HELP (4357) between the hours of 8AM to 8PM for emotional support, guidance and mental health referrals as needed. For additional information and services, call Camden County’s Office of Mental Health & Addiction at (856) 374-6361, or visit camdencounty.com.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has also made a series of mental health resources available in response to this ongoing crisis. You can view the full collection of resources by visiting https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/managing-stress-anxiety.html.

Some helpful tips from the CDC include:

Pandemics can be stressful

The COVID-19 pandemic may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about a new disease and what could happen can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children. Public health actions, such as social distancing, can make people feel isolated and lonely and can increase stress and anxiety. However, these actions are necessary to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Coping with stress in a healthy way will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger.

Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations

How you respond to stress during the COVID-19 pandemic can depend on your background, your social support from family or friends, your financial situation, your health and emotional background, the community you live in, and many other factors. The changes that can happen because of the COVID-19 pandemic and the ways we try to contain the spread of the virus can affect anyone.

People who may respond more strongly to the stress of a crisis include:

Healthy ways to cope with stress

  • Know what to do if you are sick and are concerned about COVID-19. Contact a health professional before you start any self-treatment for COVID-19.
  • Know where and how to get treatment and other support services and resources, including counseling or therapy (in person or through telehealth services).
  • Take care of your emotional health. Taking care of your emotional healthwill help you think clearly and react to the urgent needs to protect yourself and your family.
  • Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including those on social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body.
  • Make time to unwind. Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others. Talk with people you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.
  • Connect with your community- or faith-based organizations. While social distancing measures are in place, consider connecting online, through social media, or by phone or mail.

Take care of your mental health

Mental health is an important part of overall health and wellbeing. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It may also affect how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices during an emergency.

Call your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. Free and confidential resources can also help you or a loved one connect with a skilled, trained counselor in your area.

Get immediate help in a crisis

Find a health care provider or treatment for substance use disorder and mental health

Suicide

Different life experiences affect a person’s risk for suicide. For example, suicide risk is higher among people who have experienced violence, including child abuse, bullying, or sexual violence. Feelings of isolation, depression, anxiety, and other emotional or financial stresses are known to raise the risk for suicide. People may be more likely to experience these feelings during a crisis like a pandemic.

However, there are ways to protect against suicidal thoughts and behaviors. For example, support from family and community, or feeling connected, and having access to in-person or virtual counseling or therapy can help with suicidal thoughts and behavior, particularly during a crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic.

Learn more about CDC’s work in suicide prevention.

Other Resources:

If you or your loved one have any questions or need assistance, please contact the Camden County Office of Mental Health & Addiction at (856) 374-6361.

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