*Supporting Those Who Served
Joseph Kaelin, of Bass River Pleads Guilty to Sexual Assault of Underage Girl

BILL: LANDLORDS MUST NOTIFY OF TOXIC LEAD IN WATER

 

Under a bill that unanimously cleared the state Senate yesterday, tenants would have the right to know whether lead is present in their home's drinking water. The bill doesn't force landlords to fix the problem — via pipe replacement or a filtration system, for example — but it would force landlords to give tenants information they need to make decisions about their health. Landlords are currently required by law to notify new tenants of hazardous lead levels; this bill extends it to long-term tenants. (NJ.com / USA Today)

SWEENEY TO PROPOSE BALLOT QUESTION: NJ TRANSIT

Yesterday, state Senate President Steve Sweeney told reporters that he wants to change how NJ Transit is funded. Though he didn't provide many details, he emphasized the scope of the problem — a state of chronic underfunding — has worsened over decades. He will share more details later this month, before Gov. Phil Murphy shares his budget in Trenton on Feb. 25. (Politico)

JUSTICE DEPARTMENT SUES NJ OVER IMMIGRANT DIRECTIVE

The U.S. Justice Department filed a lawsuit against New Jersey on Monday. It challenges state Attorney General Gurbir Grewal's Immigrant Trust Directive, which limits police departments' cooperation with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). "It’s the Trump administration’s first significant pushback against New Jersey, whose officials have sued the federal government several times in the last three years to halt a variety of the president’s policies," reporters Monsy Alvarado and Steve Janoski write. (NorthJersey.com)

NATIONAL EXPERTS LAUNCH AUDIT OF PATERSON POLICE

Yesterday, Paterson Mayor Andre Sayegh announced new details about an upcoming nine-month audit of the city's police department. The Police Executive Resource Forum will conduct the audit, which was first announced a year ago as the city grieved Jameek Lowery's death. (TAPinto Paterson)

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