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NJ News Commons: RUTGERS UNIVERSITY WILL NAME FIRST BLACK PRESIDENT

 

Rutgers University "is set to name" its next President, Gov. Phil Murphy tweeted yesterday: Jonathan Holloway, the provost of Northwestern University. Dr. Holloway, a Professor of History and African American Studies, will be the first president of color in the university's history. 20 white male presidents — including current president Robert Barchi — precede him. The move is not yet final: the university's Board of Governors and Board of Trustees will take a formal vote at 9 A.M. on Tuesday. (Bridgewater Courier News / NJ.com)

MAJOR ELECTRIC VEHICLE INCENTIVE PROGRAM LAUNCHES

$5,000: that's how much the state will offer drivers who buy an electric car, thanks to a new law cleared by Gov. Phil Murphy on Friday. And anyone who installs charging equipment for that vehicle in their home will be eligible for a $500 rebate, too. Tom Johnson describes the new electric vehicles law as not only "a huge victory for clean energy advocates" but also "the biggest step New Jersey has taken to reduce emissions causing climate change." (NJ Spotlight)

MURPHY ENACTS NINE LAWS TO REFORM HEALTH CARE

Under a set of laws signed into law by Gov. Phil Murphy, New Jersey is now guaranteed the same protections covered by the Affordable Care Act. So no matter what happens to the federal legislation — Obamacare, as it's sometimes called — our state will essentially operate as usual. Last year, 500,000 Jersey residents were covered under Medicaid, and 255,000 people got healthcare through the online marketplace, Healthcare.gov. Murphy said New Jersey's marketplace will open up shop soon. That move will enable the state to keep $50 million plus extend the enrollment sign up period (NJ.com / NJ Spotlight)

WESTFIELD JOURNO UNCOVERED UNSAFE INFANT PRODUCTS

In this story, TAPinto Westfield features impressive reporting by a local journalist. The investigative series, "While They Were Sleeping," found that Fisher Price's Rock 'n Play sleeper was linked to the deaths of at least 73 babies over a decade — and just as with Ikea's Malm dressers, the government and the industry knew the risks. In a set of 21 articles over 10 months, Westfield resident Rachel Rabkin Peachman, who works as a deputy of special products at Consumer Reports, found that the deaths "were largely hidden from the public but reported privately to the CPSC [Consumer Products Safety Commission] by manufacturers, hospitals and consumers.” Her reporting led to a major recall of over 5 million products, and legislation — the federal Safe Sleep for Babies Act, now pending in the U.S. Senate. (TAPinto Westfield)

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