HINDU'S SAY: TCNJ refuses to withdraw its newspaper labelling Hinduism as “unforgiving”
NJ Students Named to Seton Hall University Dean's List

NJ News Commons: BILL WOULD ESTABLISH FAIR SCHEDULING FOR WORKERS

A "fair workweek" — or predictable schedulingbill was introduced by state Senate Majority Leader Loretta Weinberg on Monday, and details were confirmed in a presser held yesterday. If it's passed by the state Legislature and then signed by Gov. Phil Murphy, the bill would guarantee employees the ability to plan their lives two weeks in advance, thanks to a new, mandatory scheduling buffer. It also ensures employees are scheduled to work a set number of hours per week, plus a 12-hour break between shifts, unless the employee decides to work sooner, for time-and-a-half pay. As written now, the legislation cover companies with over 250 employees. (Politico / WHYY)

NJ TRANSIT CRITICIZED IN NEW AUDIT FOR PERFORMANCE

A state audit of NJ Transit's performance between July 1, 2016 to Oct. 31, 2019 found that its trains were less on-time than before that period. Part of the reason why — a third of it — was due to "preventable" reasons. And it's "debatable" whether it will meet a federal safety deadline. (NorthJersey.com)

ALMOST 200 PEOPLE HAVE HAD GUNS SEIZED UNDER LAW

The state's so-called red flag law — the Extreme Risk Protective Order Act — went into effect on September 1. Since then, almost 200 people have given up their guns. The law requires a judge to issue an order after someone has made the case that an individual is a danger to himself or others. (NJ.com)

ART PROJECT RECLAIMS DUMPING GROUNDS IN CAMDEN

Under a $1 million art project grant funded by Bloomberg Philanthropies, a set of art installations will cover Camden's former illegal dumping sites — eight in all. (131 applicants submitted ideas.) It's called "A New View." The art will be open at the sites between May and October. (NJ Pen / TAPinto Camden)

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