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NY WILL STOP ABANDONING HOMELESS FAMILIES—FOR NOW 

 

New York City's relocation and subsidized rent program for homeless familiescaused a big stir in North Jersey, with mayors in Newark and Elizabeth speaking out. Newark Mayor Ras Baraka filed a lawsuit last week against Mayor Bill de Blasio's administration — more than half of the affected families settled in 4ef2ddad-68fe-4367-af9d-5f794a541b69Newark (1,200 of 2,226 families). Elizabeth Mayor Chris Bollwage said his city intended to join Newark's filing. But it appears that the fight may be over, at least for now. According to an agreement made in federal court yesterday, New York will pause this program, at least temporarily. It will also send Newark a list of where these families are living. This will help cities conduct inspections of the rental properties to ensure safe living conditions. (NJ.com / NJTV News)

FEDS: LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS CAN BE SHIPPED VIA PORT

In a move called "reckless" by an environmentalist coalition called Empower NJ — and "irresponsible" by Peter DeFazio, chair of the U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure — the Trump administration approved permits that will allow up to 100 rail cars of liquefied natural gas (LNG) per day to be transported to a South Jersey port terminal. The fuel is sourced from fracking operations in Pennsylvania. Other permits are still pending. (The Inquirer)

EXPANDING ACCESS: IMMIGRANTS COULD EARN LICENSES

The state Assembly Judiciary Committee heard testimony yesterday from advocates who support a bill moving its way through the Legislature. It's a long time coming, they say, because a driver's license can seem crucial to making life work — regardless of your immigration status. The committee approved the bill. If it clears the full floor, our state likely will be the 15th in the nation to enact this into law — because Gov. Phil Murphy has voiced support. (WHYY)

STATE POLLUTION FUNDING DROPS DOUBLE DIGITS: STUDY

A new report by the Environmental Integrity Project has found that the funding that supports the state's Department of Environmental Protection is following a nationwide trend. The coffers for pollution control in our state have shrunk by about 12 percent over the last decade. More than half the country — 30 states — were faced with lower budgets, the report found. Wisconsin was the hardest: it lost 36 percent of its pollution control budget in the last ten years. (NJ Spotlight)

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