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NJBIA VP Mike Wallace Selected as 2020 Lead NJ Fellow

 

NJBIA Vice President Michael Wallace has been chosen as a 2020 Lead New Jersey Fellow, joining a select group of business, government and nonprofit leaders who will spend the next 12 months exploring major public policy issues facing New Jersey and identifying solutions. Business news

Lead New Jersey Fellows, who are already leaders in their companies and communities, hone their leadership skills by studying the issues that have the greatest impact on New Jersey residents' lives and then work with other talented leaders to shape improvements.

"NJBIA is proud to have Mike selected to be part of Lead New Jersey's Class of 2020," said NJBIA President & CEO Michele Siekerka, Esq. "Mike's experience leading NJBIA's advocacy efforts on labor, workforce development, manufacturing, apprenticeships and job training policies makes him an ideal candidate for Lead New Jersey's program."

A resident of Sewell in Gloucester County, Wallace joined NJBIA in 2015, after having worked as a legislative aide to state Senator Fred Madden (D-4). A graduate of the University of Delaware, Wallace also previously worked as an aide to former Camden Mayor Dana Redd and Gov. Jon Corzine.

Upon completion of the program, Wallace will be part of a distinguished alumni comprised of more than 1,600 Lead New Jersey fellows who have graduated over the past 34 years, including NJBIA's Chief Government Affairs Officer Chrissy Buteas (2008) and Chief Business Relations Officer Wayne Staub, a member of the Class of 2019 honored on Dec. 5 at the Princeton Marriott at Forrestal.

 

Lead New Jersey educates, empowers and engages talented leaders to create systemic change around New Jersey's most challenging issues. Going into its 34th year, LNJ boasts an alumni base of more than 1,600 Fellows, including corporate and nonprofit executives and elected and appointed government officials. For more information, go to www.leadnj.org.

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