In the Murphy Era, Some Progress with Women's Representation on NJ Boards and Commissions;
Legionnaire/World War II Veteran Clarence Smoyer, of PA, Awarded Bronze Star

NJ WIND FARM MAY CONNECT TO EX-NUKE PLANT EQUIPMENT

 

On Tuesday, Danish energy giant Ørsted announced it might connect its 1,100-megawatt offshore wind farm by cable to the former site of Oyster Creek, a nuclear power plant. It's a 15-mile span — and the plant's infrastructure will help link the wind farm to the grid. While New Jersey Sierra Club director Jeff Tittel is giving the idea a thumbs up, local residents in Lacey Township say the nuclear plant's decommissioning process still poses a risk to their safety. Ørsted claims the project has the capacity to provide power to about half a million homes, and it could be completed as soon as 2024. (Associated Press)

ARTIST DROPS 800-POUND OPIOID SPOON AT J&J'S OFFICES

A massive sculpture warped into the shape of a opioid-burnt spoon was hand-delivered to the doorstep of Johnson and Johnson's offices in New Brunswick yesterday. The artist, Dominic Esposito, has made similar drops nationwide, 4ef2ddad-68fe-4367-af9d-5f794a541b69while sharing how opioid addiction has ravaged his own family. J&J currently faces a $572 million fine after a judge in Oklahoma found the company over-stated the benefits and downplayed the dangers of its opioid drugs in its advertising. In a statement about the protest, its vice president said, "Johnson & Johnson did not cause the opioid crisis in Oklahoma or elsewhere." (NJ.com)

CHARTER GROUP FILES MOTION TO INTERVENE IN LAWSUIT

The New Jersey Charter Schools Association has filed a motion in a school desegregation suit brought by the New Jersey Coalition for Diverse and Inclusive Schools. "This lawsuit unfairly blames charter schools," NJCSA's president said, calling for negotiation. "Charter schools simply look like the neighborhoods they are located in, whereas public school systems have looked this way long before charter schools came into existence." (Politico)

STATE STARTS ISSUING FEDERALLY-REQUIRED 'REAL ID'S

So-called 'Real ID's are here — but not for everyone just yet. The state Motor Vehicle Commission announced yesterday that the agency will begin reaching out to residents who signed up for the state's waiting list. Those 55,000 people will be invited to make appointments in Trenton. And don't worry, this higher-security card isn't required for day-to-day tasks like driving. (NJTV News)

Comments