News & World Report names Virtua Voorhees and Virtua Our Lady of Lourdes among Best Hospitals
Menendez Urges CSPC to Protect Beachgoers from Dangers of Flying Beach Umbrellas

TWO NEW LAWS AIM TO HELP STUDENT BORROWERS IN NJ

The federal student loan burden for the million or so students in our state is about $36.5 billion, according to the Office of Federal Student Aid. Two bills that were just signed into law by Lt. Gov. Sheila Oliver are designed to give students more control 4ef2ddad-68fe-4367-af9d-5f794a541b69over their debt. One law requires colleges to display their actual costs on a standard “shopping sheet” so students can compare institutions more easily. The other creates the role of a student loan ombudsman, which is an officer employed by the state to advocate on behalf of students. (WHYY)

NJ NATIVE KILLED IN PARKLAND IS INSPIRING FEDERAL LAW

In February, Gov. Phil Murphy enacted Alyssa's Law. It requires all public schools to install silent panic alarms. Advocates say the technology could have saved the lives of the 17 people killed at the Parkland massacre last year, including 14-year-old Alyssa Alhadeff, who lived in Woodcliff Lake before moving to Florida. Rep. Josh Gottheimer (D-5) plans to introduce a similar federal bill in the House this week. The measure would require any public school that receives federal education aid to install the alarms. (NJ.com)

HEALTH OFFICIALS WORK TO CURB HEPATITIS A OUTBREAK

Hepatitis A — a rarer type of Hepatitis that's spread through contaminated food or via feces — is on the rise in our state, and health officials are encouraging people to take proper precautions. That means wash your hands, get tested, and get vaccinated. In the last seven months, there have been 326 new cases, which is about seven times higher than the previous year. (NJ Spotlight)

THE QUEST TO BAN DISCRIMINATION BASED ON BLACK HAIR

This excellent story by Svetlana Shkolnikova follows up on a painful incidentthat attracted national attention in December. A Black wrestler was given an option on the mat: either cut your hair, or forfeit your chance to compete. It wasn't much of a choice, Jersey City Assemblywoman Angela McKnight says. She's sponsoring a bill that expands the state's anti-discrimination law to include and protect Black hair texture — so locks, twists, and braids, which are still the source of bias, unfair treatment, and discrimination. (The Record)

 

🙈 We're keeping an eye on—

  • Homeless population down in NJ yet up in nine counties (NJ Spotlight)
  • Teacher fired for reporting 'discriminatory' tweet (Asbury Park Press)
  • Groper in Princeton strikes again — 13 times since 2014 (NJ 101.5)
  • NJ public schools ranked second best in the nation (Asbury Park Press)

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