NJBIA Statement on State Revenue Announcements
OFFICER DOWN: Savannah Police Sergeant Kelvin Ansari, Shot and Killed

NJ News Commons: RUTGERS STUDENT PAPER IN DANGER OF SHUTTING DOWN

 

For the first time in its history, the daily student paper at Rutgers University, The Daily Targum, failed to pass a student funding referendum that is crucial for its operating budget. The paper is written and edited entirely by students, and it has served Rutgers since 1869. Its future is uncertain because less than 25% of students voted 'yes' on a refundable $11.25 fee. (TAPinto New Brunswick)
Note: A Daily Targum story made the 'Top 4' in this newsletter on April 18.

FUTURE OF STANDARDIZED TESTING DEBATED AT HEARING

Yesterday, legislators heard from several speakers at a hearing on the state's standardized testing policies, including the much-debated tests formerly known as PARCC (Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers). In the fall, Gov. Phil Murphy announced a new name for the shorter and re-designed tests: the New Jersey Student Learning Assessments. So-called exit tests, which students must pass in order to graduate, were also debated — only 11 states have this requirement on the books. (NJTV News)

BILL REMEMBERS WOMAN WHO DIED WHEN POWER SHUT OFF

The state Assembly Telecommunications Committee advanced a bill yesterday that was named in memory of a Newark resident who died last year after PSE&G shut off electricity to her home — including her oxygen mask. "Linda's Law" would prohibit electrical utilities from doing the same thing to New Jersey customers who depend on powered medical equipment. Utilities would also verify customers' medical conditions through doctor's notes. (TAPinto Newark)

NEW REPORT DETAILS HEALTH OF NJ SENIORS - A BIT BETTER

A report released yesterday by the UnitedHealth Foundation (which is, of course, associated with the insurance giant) ranked older adults nationwide on a number of health measures. New Jersey climbed up this year: now, the state is 21st. (Last year, it was ranked 23rd.) But in 2017 and 2016, it was slightly better, at 19th. There's a new segment: adults ages 65 to 74, who "are drinking more, have higher rates of diabetes and obesity, and are more likely to commit suicide than they were years ago," Lilo H. Stainton writes. (NJ Spotlight)

Comments