Spring Shopping Expo in Audubon May 5
Multiple Alarm Fire in Gloucester City

GOVERNOR SIGNS GENDER PAY-EQUITY LAW

Screen Shot 2017-11-28 at 15.20.47


Gov. Phil Murphy signed on Tuesday what is being called the nation’s toughest gender pay-equity law, NJ Spotlight writes. The new law, which takes effect on July 1, allows women and members of other protected classes to sue for triple damages for pay discrimination. It also bars employers for punishing workers for discussing how much money they are being paid. The Asbury Park Press offers five things New Jerseyans should know about the new law.

FEWER NJ HOSPITALS RECEIVE TOP GRADE FOR PATIENT SAFETY


The latest report card for patient safety shows that eight fewer hospitals in New Jersey received the top grade, NJ.com reports. The Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grades are compiled twice a year. The ratings released Tuesday showed that 22 hospitals received an A grade, compared with 30 in the previous assessment. New Jersey’s national ranking dropped to 17th from 11th.

LAWYERS: BRIDGEGATE SCHEME WAS WRONG BUT NOT CRIMINAL
Lawyers for two former aides to Gov. Chris Christie argued before a federal Appeals Court on Tuesday that the scheme to close some traffic lanes at the George Washington Bridge, causing traffic jams in Fort Lee, was wrong but not criminal, The Record writes. The aides, Bill Baroni and Bridget Kelly, are facing prison terms for the political payback scheme aimed at Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich after he did not endorse Christie for re-election. The architect of the scheme, David Wildstein, pleaded guilty to federal charges and testified against Baroni and Kelly in their trial.

POLL: NEW JERSEYANS UNEASY ABOUT ECONOMY
The latest poll released by Stockton University indicates that New Jerseyans do not feel confident about the state’s economy, the Observer reports. People who live in South Jersey are more pessimistic about the economy than people who live in North Jersey, the poll indicates. 

NJ SUPREME COURT EXEMPTS SOME SEX OFFENDERS FROM MEGAN’S LAW
Some sex offenders who were convicted before they reached age 18 can be removed from the registry established under Megan’s Law, The Record reports. Under a ruling by the New Jersey Supreme Court, someone convicted of a sex crime as a youth who has committed no new sex offenses for 15 years can be removed from the registry. 

Comments