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NJ NEWS COMMONS: CHRISTIE TEACHES POLITENESS TO MOTOR VEHICLES EMPLOYEES

 

Now that Gov. Christie's main job in big-tent politics is to stand demurely behind Donald Trump, he has to work harder to seize the opportunity for outrage. So when a woman called the monthly "Ask the Governor" show to complain about shoddy treatment at the Plainfield Motor Vehicle Commission office, the governor was on it.

NJTV actually livestreamed Christie's visit to the offending bureaucracy yesterday. “I think oftentimes, a minority of folks who work for the state begin to feel kind of entitled," Christie said. "And feel like these people are part of the problem, not part of the people who are paying their salaries." MVC officials across the state will get more customer service training, he pledged. 

 

BUT, HE SAYS, THAT WAS NOT AN EYE ROLL 

Meanwhile, Christie took the opportunity to say that his wife Mary Pat's display of ocular gymnastics Tuesday night, standing behind the podium while Donald Trump introduced the "woman card" into the race, was not an eye roll: “I’ve seen the Mary Pat eye roll for 32 years. That was not an eye roll.” And he's right. Though the event caused a sensation on Twitter, Bustle says the technical term for Mary Pat's apparent reaction to Trump is called a "side eye," which can even be used as a verb. Bets on next time Mary Pat is invited to stand behind the podium, anyone?

 

YOU THINK THE MVC IS BAD? TRY TRAFFIC COURT

And speaking of outrage, the MVC just gives you license to drive. It's traffic court that has the power to take that away. Or, as Star-Ledger columnist Mark Di Ionno writes, fleece you. Di Ionno, who landed in traffic court for an infraction earned while visiting an elderly relative in the hospital, made journalistic use of the experience. Have a pine-tree air freshener hanging from your rear-view mirror? That can cost you $84. Turns out that pulling cars over for minor traffic stops is a big revenue producer for the state -- $405,611,768 just last year. But, as Di Ionno points out, cops say ticket quotas drive a wedge between them and the communities they're sworn to protect.

 

WANT TO INTERVIEW THE PREZ? JUST ASK

One person not complaining about anything this week? Dan Corey, editor in chief of Rutgers' Daily Targum. The AP reports that when President Obama stopped by a White House presser for visiting college students yesterday, he called first on Corey, who used the opportunity to ask for a second wish: a private interview with the president. He got it -- because Obama is speaking at Rutgers commencement May 15. But even a silver cloud can have a dark lining. USA Today reports that students at Rutgers are already (you guessed it) outraged about the limited tickets and parking that will result from POTUS taking the podium.

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