Obituary | Donna M. Jetter of Bellmawr
Former Camden County Correction Officer Arrested

Mixed Results for Women in 2015 Elections

press release

The Center for American Women and Politics released the following statement today about the November 3, 2015 elections. 

Elections in five states yielded mixed results for women candidates. Numbers and party balances shifted slightly among women in state legislatures; among the three legislatures where results are complete or nearly so, the proportion of women will increase slightly in two and decrease in one. (The results in Louisiana will not be complete until November 21.) For current and historical context, CAWP’s website provides state-by-state information about women in federal, statewide and state legislative offices.

New Jersey: Legislature (Assembly, plus one special election for State Senate)
Two Republican incumbent women lost their seats in Assembly races, one defeated by a Democratic woman. One race involving an incumbent Republican woman is still too close to call (tctc). A total of five new women (4D, 1R) won Assembly races, joining 20 incumbents who were re-elected. Depending on the outcome of the pending race, the number of women in the New Jersey Assembly will increase by either 1 or 2 (to 25 or 26), but the party balance among women will change to 18 Democrats and either 7 or 8 Republicans (from the previous 15D, 9R). The newcomers (4D, 1R) include two women of color: Angela McKnight (D-31, who is Black) and Annette Chaparro (D-33, who is Latina). The other newcomers are Patricia Egan Jones (D-5), Joann Downey (D-11), and Gail Phoebus (R-24).

“While five new women will serve in the Assembly, the balance of women in the party caucuses will shift,“ noted CAWP director Debbie Walsh. “Women will now make up more than a third of the Democratic caucus, but around a quarter of the Republican caucus. It’s a loss for the state not to have women’s perspectives fully represented in both parties.”

In the only State Senate election, incumbent Senator Nilsa Cruz-Perez, appointed earlier in the year to fill a vacancy, won her special election. The New Jersey Senate will continue to have 11 women (8D, 3R).

Even if the total number of women in the New Jersey legislature rises to 37 (30.8%), the state would maintain its rank of 11th in the nation for the proportion of women legislators.

New Jersey Assembly Candidates and Winners

page1image22464

 

D

page1image24992

R

Total

page1image27832

Can

page1image29424

Win

page1image31856 page1image32176

Can

Win

Can

page1image35240

Win

Incumbent

page1image38864

14

page1image40024

14

9

6 (+1 tctc)

23

page1image44632

20 (+ 1 tctc)

Challenger

11

1

7

0

18

1

Open Seat

page1image52872

4

page1image54464

3

page1image55512 page1image55832

1

1

5

page1image60600

4

Total

29

18

17

7 or 8

46

25 or 26

Kentucky: Statewide Executive
Jenean Hampton (R) will become Kentucky’s new lieutenant governor, while Republican Allison Ball won an open-seat race for state treasurer. Incumbent Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes (D) won re-election.

Louisiana: Statewide Executive and Legislature
Louisiana elections feature an open primary, and candidates who secure more than 50% of the vote are elected without run-off contests; if no candidate receives 50%, the top two compete in a run-off, this year on November 21. No women were elected or chosen for run-offs for statewide offices.

Four women (3D, 1R) won their primaries for the state senate. Another 1 woman (1R) is competing in a run-off. Twelve women (6D, 6R) won their primaries for the state house; an additional 7 (4D, 3R) face run-offs.

Mississippi: Statewide Executive and Legislature
In statewide executive races, Lynn Fitch, the incumbent state treasurer, won re-election, as did Cindy Hyde-Smith, the incumbent agriculture commissioner. Both are Republicans.

In the state legislature, there are two races involving women candidates that are still too close to call (tctc), one in each house. Even if those races are won by women, the total number of women in the Mississippi legislature will drop from the current 30 to no more than 26. Already among the ten worst states for women’s representation, Mississippi is likely to drop still further.

Mississippi Legislative Candidates and Winners

 

Senate

House of Representatives

Legislature

 

D

R

Total

D

R

page2image24728

Total

Total

 

Can

page2image28912

Win

Can

Win

Can

page2image34512

Win

Can

page2image36976 page2image38304

Win

Can

page2image39968 page2image41296

Win

Can

page2image43296 page2image43776

Win

Can

page2image45760 page2image46184

Win

page2image48008

Incumbent

2

2

5

4 (+1 tctc)

7

6 (+1 tctc)

11

10

4

4

15

14

22

20 (+1 tctc)

Challenger

2

0

0

0

2

0

4

page2image71312 page2image72216

0

0

page2image74304 page2image75208

0

4

page2image76888 page2image77688

0

6

0

Open Seat

2

2

1

1

3

3

3

page2image91480

0 (+1 tctc)

1

page2image93888

1

4

page2image95696

1 (+1 tctc)

7

4 (+1 tctc)

Total

6

4

6

page2image104208 page2image104528

5 (+1 tctc)

12

page2image106520

9
(+1 tctc)

18

10 (+1 tctc)

5

5

23

15 (+1 tctc)

35

24 (+2 tctc)

2

Virginia: Legislature
The number of women in the Virginia legislature will rise from 24 (17.1%) to 27 (19.3%).

Virginia Legislature Candidates and Winners

 

Senate

page3image5224

House of Delegates

Legislature

page3image7240 page3image7560 page3image8304 page3image8624
 

D

R

page3image11128

Total

page3image12192

D

page3image13256

R

page3image14320

Total

Total

page3image16976

Can

page3image19072

Win

Can

page3image22064

Win

Can

page3image24008 page3image25128

Win

Can

page3image26808 page3image27928

Win

Can

page3image29608 page3image30728

Win

Can

page3image32408 page3image33528

Win

Can

page3image35208 page3image36328

Win

page3image37248

Incumbent

6

6

1

1

7

7

11

11

4

4

15

15

22

22

Challenger

page3image49560

3

page3image51336

0

1

page3image54328

0

4

page3image57496 page3image57976

0

11

page3image60296 page3image60776

0

2

page3image63096 page3image63576

0

13

page3image65896 page3image66376

0

17

page3image68696 page3image69176

0

page3image70896

Open Seat

1

0

2

2

3

2

3

3

0

0

3

3

6

5

Total

10

6

4

3

14

page3image90728 page3image91208

9

25

page3image93720 page3image94200

14

6

page3image96712 page3image97192

4

31

page3image99704 page3image100184

18

45

page3image102696 page3image103176

27

page3image104936 page3image105096

About CAWP

The Center for American Women and Politics, a unit of the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey is a university-based research, education and public service center. Its mission is to promote greater knowledge and understanding about women’s changing relationship to politics and government and to enhance women’s influence and leadership in public life. CAWP is a leading authority in its field and a respected bridge between the academic and political worlds.

-end- 

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