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Watchdog.org reporters amplify school choice

by Andrew Collins 6a00d8341bf7d953ef019aff44950d970b-320wi

Few choices that parents make about their children are as important as where they will be educated.

Important, that is, if they are actually permitted to choose.

Looking at the polling data, school choice programs should be sweeping the nation. Simply put, school choice is the idea that children and parents should be able to choose from a variety of educational options rather than being forced into a publicly mandated school. Time and again, they have proven effective at improving students’ test scores and graduation rates. And recent polls have found strong bipartisan support for this idea, with 69 percent of Americans saying that parents should have the right to use education tax dollars to send their child to the public or private school that best serves their needs. Yet in reality, school choice programs are still relatively rare across the country, despite their popularity.

This week is National School Choice Week, when groups and organizations from all over the country work together to “shine a positive spotlight on the need for effective education options for all children.”

To amplify this conversation about the power of school choice to transform both the lives of children and the communities in which they live, the Franklin Center’s professional journalism division, Watchdog.org, has devoted more reporters to the education beat than any other subject over the past year. This is unique among almost all other media organizations. Our five-person team of education reporters is seizing the school choice narrative all over the country – from our nation’s capital to the suburbs and inner cities.

learn more amplify school choiceIn doing so, they help fulfill a critical part the Franklin Center’s mission to keep government accountable to the people and act as a watchdog for taxpayers. Local government is often the “laboratory of democracy” where new education policies are road-tested – and either succeed or fail. On the micro level, it is important for reporters to cover new policies and schools because taxpayers in those communities deserve to know whether the money devoted to education is well-spent. And on the macro level, these stories deserve national attention because they can provide a template for education reform for other cities and states across America.

What does this look like in action? Our coverage of school choice issues tends to focus on two basic narratives, highlighting how school choice programs are giving poor children or those with special needs a quality education that they would not have otherwise received, or looking at communities where school choice does not exist and seeing the great lengths to which families will go to try to give their children a better future.

This may mean shining a light on low-income students in Washington, D.C. who have been denied scholarships through the Opportunity Scholarship Program.

Perhaps it means telling the story of Paul Davis, a single father in St. Louis who works part time as a taxi driver to supplement his Social Security income. Davis’ son has mild to moderate autism and was often bullied at Normandy Middle School. He had no other option, until the school lost its accreditation and a state law allowed Davis to transfer his son to new school in one of the highest performing districts in the state, where his experience has been much better.

Or on a more positive note, covering school choice may look like this story about the success of Hope Christian School in Milwaukee, which recently opened a new campus. The new campus has grown from just 47 K-4 students when it opened in 2002 to a current student body of 580. The school has posted huge successes, such as a 100 percent college acceptance rate for its seniors over the past two years.

These are just a few of the scores of stories told by Watchdog.org’s education reporters over the past year. Together they are shaping the narrative of the state of education in America, showing readers how school choice could be the key to a better future for the next generation.

- DISPLAYED HERE WITH PERMISSION  http://franklincenterhq.org

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