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Op-Ed: How Do You Define "Fair Share?" | cnbnews.net

Graphic and Opinion by Wil Levins

FAIR SHARE(cnbnews.net)Throughout the Presidential Campaign season and the current "Fiscal Cliff" negotiations, the term "Fair Share" has been used in political rhetoric to debate Income Tax Rates and Government Spending in the public forum.  However, the term has not, and I argue cannot, be specifically defined.  I believe paying one's "Fair Share" is a very admirable idea in concept but, what exactly amounts to a "Fair Share" in real numbers?  I use the scenario below to illustrate the point that throwing around this term "Fair Share" is a useless rhetorical ploy employed by both sides to dodge facing the very realistic problem of revenue vs. expenditures - because defining "Fair Share" is relative to each of own individual principles and personal philosophies.  Try answering the question below and see how applying your idea of "Fair Share" compares to others.

Question:

Based on the information below, how would you apply the concept of "Fair Share" to settle a restaurant dinner check? Who pays and how much should each pay?

The total bill for dinner is $300.

The dinner involves 5 couples .

1 couple are low income earners. They have $30 between them to spend for dinner.

1 couple are lower-middle income earners. They have $50 between them to spend for dinner.

1 couple are middle-middle income earners. They have $75 between them to spend for dinner.

1 couple are upper-middle income earners.  They have $100 between them to spend for dinner.

1 couple are high income earners. They have $350 between them to spend for dinner.



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